The CARE Foundation was established in August 2004 to:

  • Build a worldwide community of physicians, veterinarians, biomedical scientists, industrial partners, and pet owners with a common goal of advancing veterinary & human medicine.
  • Provide a mechanism to utilize animals with spontaneous disease for clinical research.

The Foundation is classified as a Section 501(c)3 organization under the Internal Revenue Code and is recognized as a private foundation as described in Section 509(a)1 of the Code. Individuals, corporations, associations and foundations are eligible to support the work of the CARE Foundation through tax-deductible gifts.

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To promote and enhance the use of animals with spontaneous disease for clinical studies through education of the health care community and development of Registry of Spontaneous Diseases (RESPOND™)

  • Promote evidence-based medicine in veterinary practice.
  • Foster a global network of veterinarians, physicians, researchers & pet owners.
  • Improve understanding of spontaneous diseases of animals, their treatment and outcomes.
  • Educate researchers, clinicians, and corporate partners as to the benefits of studying animals with spontaneous diseases.

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Founding Board of Directors (Click below for Biography)
Terry Fossum, DVM, PhD          Michael E. DeBaky, MD     Edwin J. Lamm III
Theresa W. Fossum, DVM, PhD
Diplomate ACVS
President, CARE Foundation
Tom and Joan Read Chair
    in Veterinary Surgery
Texas A&M University,
College of Veterinary Medicine
    Michael E. DeBakey, MD
Chancellor emeritus
Baylor College of Medicine,
Houston, Texas
         Edwin J. Lamm III, Esq.
Lamm and Smith, P. C.,
Houston, Texas

Scientific Advisory Board (Click below for Biography)
Mark Entman, MD, PhD         
Mark Entman, MD, PhD
Baylor College of Medicine,
Houston, Texas
         Sonya Gordon, DVM
Diplomate ACVIM-Cardiology
Texas A&M University,
College of Veterinary Medicine

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  • Build global awareness of spontaneous animal diseases
  • Promote use of animals with spontaneous disease in clinical studies through establishing a global registry for animals with spontaneous diseases (RESPOND™)
  • Encourage evidence-based veterinary medicine
  • Provide educational tools for pet owners, veterinarians, governmental agencies and drug developers
  • Decrease dependence on lab animal models for human preclinical studies
  • Increase the predictive nature of critical path, preclinical drug studies; thereby reducing time and cost of drug development for human and veterinary markets.
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